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Motif-based sequence analysis tools

Tutorial and training materials by OpenHelix

The MEME suite is a freely available collection of tools that can be used to discover motifs in a set of DNA or protein sequences. MEME stands for Multiple Expectation Maximum for Motif Elicitation. With MEME suite you can: discover motifs in DNA or protein sequences; search sequence databases using a given motifs; compare a given motif to all motifs that are in a motif database; and associate motifs with the Gene Ontology terms that are listed for a motifs putative target genes.
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You'll learn:

  • about the different components of the MEME suite, and how they interconnect
  • how to discover motifs within DNA or protein sequences
  • to align motifs and search for motifs
  • to use the MEME suite to search for motif similarity and GO association


Related tutorials

This tutorial is a part of the tutorial group Motif analysis tools. You might find the other tutorials in the group interesting:

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Recent BioMed Central research articles citing this resource

Hou Cheng-Yu et al., Beyond cleaved small RNA targets: unraveling the complexity of plant RNA degradome data Plant genomics. BMC Genomics (2014) doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-15

Van Bortle Kevin et al., Insulator function and topological domain border strength scale with architectural protein occupancy. Genome Biology (2014) doi:10.1186/gb-2014-15-5-r82

Feng Jian et al., Chronic cocaine-regulated epigenomic changes in mouse nucleus accumbens. Genome Biology (2014) doi:10.1186/gb-2014-15-4-r65

Levitsky G Victor et al., Application of experimentally verified transcription factor binding sites models for computational analysis of ChIP-Seq data Transcriptomic methods. BMC Genomics (2014) doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-80

Bodewes Rogier et al., Viral metagenomic analysis of feces of wild small carnivores Other viruses (e.g. pox, papilloma, parvo, reoviridae). Virology Journal (2014) doi:10.1186/1743-422X-11-89

More about the resource:

The MEME suite was originally created by Timothy Bailey from the University of Queensland, Australia and William Stafford Noble from the University of Washington. Currently, the MEME suite continues to be developed and maintained by a group from the University of Queensland, the University of Washington, the University of California at San Diego, the San Diego SuperComputer Center, the NBCR, the CBRC and the National Center for Research Resources.


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Copyright 2009, OpenHelix, LLC.

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